materialsworld:

Here’s YouTube’s The Slow Mo Guys filming superhydrophobic and magnetic liquid in super-slow speed. Cool, huh?

If that’s got you interested in superhydrophobic materials, read this piece from Materials World’s regular material of the month feature.

By

jtotheizzoe:

In the “Atoms In Motion” introduction to Richard Feynman’s famous Lectures on Physics (which you can actually watch, thanks to Microsoft), there’s a very interesting footnote. I saw it in the condensed and immensely enjoyable Six Easy Pieces, which everyone should read:

“One can burn a diamond in air”

That took me by surprise. But it’s true! The video above from Theodore Gray (who is really good at burning stuff) shows that diamond will ignite if brought to a certain temperature and given enough oxygen to latch on to. Like Feynman said, those carbon atoms and oxygen atoms love each other, and want to snap together (which gives off heat), but enough input energy must be applied first to break down the diamond crystal, (which also makes carbon atoms pretty happy).

Interesting note about cheap old zirconium in there, too …

(tip of the torch to Freelance Astrophysicist, where I found the video)

The Belorussian iron and steel mill decided to adopt marketing practices of major foreign corporations, which annually make colorful calendars with naked girls – and presented its own calendar with naked women workers of the plant.

The Belorussian iron and steel mill decided to adopt marketing practices of major foreign corporations, which annually make colorful calendars with naked girls – and presented its own calendar with naked women workers of the plant.

harvardseas:

Now you see it, now you don’t. A new device invented at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) can absorb 99.75% of infrared light that shines on it. When activated, it appears black to infrared cameras.
Composed of just a 180-nanometer-thick layer of vanadium dioxide (VO2) on top of a sheet of sapphire, the device reacts to temperature changes by reflecting dramatically more or less infrared light. [READ MORE]

harvardseas:

Now you see it, now you don’t. A new device invented at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) can absorb 99.75% of infrared light that shines on it. When activated, it appears black to infrared cameras.

Composed of just a 180-nanometer-thick layer of vanadium dioxide (VO2) on top of a sheet of sapphire, the device reacts to temperature changes by reflecting dramatically more or less infrared light. [READ MORE]

It is the behavior and distribution of the electrons around the nucleus that give the fundamental character of an atom: it must be the same for molecules.

C. A. Coulson (1910–1974, professor of chemistry, Oxford University)

(Found in a Gaussian03 output file, how classy)

Scotch tape finds new use as grasping ‘smart material’

Scotch tape finds new use as grasping ‘smart material’

Tim Butler: Diffraction pattern calculated from a circular array of dots

Tim Butler: Diffraction pattern calculated from a circular array of dots